[ Login ]

ID Forum

xxx



928x



907x



969x



878x
Steppenpieper oder östl. Spornpieper?

Christmas Island (Mus f Naturkde Berlin), Australien, 02-2018
© Nikolas Haass





921x



798x
 

2018-12-30   1
Nikolas Haass

Steppenpieper oder östl. Spornpieper?
Moin, Ist das ein Steppenpieper oder eine der östlichen Unterarten des Spornpiepers? Der Vogel wurde am 14.02.1923 auf Christmas Island, Australien (näher an Indonesien) gesammelt. Der Balg ist im Museum für Naturkunde Berlin. Im Rahmen mehrere taxonomischer Änderungen wurde der Vogel anscheinend als Sporn-, Steppen- und Brachpieper bestimmt. Hier in Australien ist nur eine Art heimisch, der Australspornpieper, der auch manchmal in zwei Arten gesplittet wird (Australian Pipit und New Zealand Pipit). Viele Grüße und alles Gute für 2019! Nikolas


2019-06-03   2
Nikolas Haass

Steppenpieper oder östl. Spornpieper?
Habe bisher nur eine Antwort bekommen: "Die Schwanzzeichnung sowie die sehr lange Hinterkralle sollten eigentlich Steppenpieper ausschließen. ... Ich neige in Richtung Paddyfield Pipit, Anthus rufulus malayensis."

Habt Ihr weitere Ideen?

Gruß,

Nikolas


2019-06-03   3
Nikolas Haass

Steppenpieper oder östl. Spornpieper?
Habe bisher nur eine Antwort bekommen: "Die Schwanzzeichnung sowie die sehr lange Hinterkralle sollten eigentlich Steppenpieper ausschließen. ... Ich neige in Richtung Paddyfield Pipit, Anthus rufulus malayensis."

Habt Ihr weitere Ideen?

Gruß,

Nikolas


2019-06-09   4
Nikolas Haass

Steppenpieper oder östl. Spornpieper?
Weiß nicht genau, warum ich gefragt wurde, diesen Fall nochmal aufzurollen, um dann die folgende Antwort zu bekommen. Hört sich so an, als wollte jemand die Bestimmung Paddyfield Pipit, ssp. Anthus rufulus malayensis, nicht akzeptieren.

"Hi all, maybe I am not reading Nikolas’ e-mail (below) correctly, but if my interpretation of it - that the comment from hi contacts in Germany have ruled out the identity of the ‘historical’ Christmas Island specimen on the grounds of tail pattern and hind claw length – is correct, then all I can say is that the contact must have been looking at a different specimen !!! The tail pattern of the Christmas Island bird (see attachment in one of my earlier e-mails, and repeated here) is absolutely “classic” Blyth’s and, as such, quite different from that of their “suggested” Paddyfield Pipit. Similarly the measurement (provided to me by Dr. Steinheimer) of 12.2 mm is absolutely mid-range for a Blyth’s. So I basically and utterly disagree on both of the points raised.
I would also reiterate one of my previous comments. This specimen, originally i/d’d as what is now the malayensis form of the Paddyfield Pipit, was – after second thoughts on the matter (by Chasen) – sent the E. Stresemann (a leading expert of that era), His identification was that it was a Blyth’s Pipit, and this how it is currently registered/housed in the Berlin Museum collection. I have not personally seen the specimen and as such think that it would be fatuous on my part to disagree with such experts (past and present) as to the id. of this specimen. Nevertheless I asked for (and received) photographs and measurements which, to my mind, confirm the fact that this is indeed the specimen collected on Christmas Island, and that the id. is correct. In order to convince myself that this could not have been one of the smaller ssp. of the Richards Pipit, I also asked for (and was provided with) photos of a specimen of the taxon sinensis; these enabled me to eliminate that possibility. These latter photos can be made available if anyone wishes to look them over."

Ich riet ihm eine volle Beschreibung mit allen Photos und Messdaten an BARC (Australische Seltenheitenkommission) zu schicken, damit wir uns professionell damit befassen können.

Gruß,

Nikolas